DIY to encourage good manners. Well, improved manners anyway.

Why yes, as a matter of fact, I do get tired of talking about going to the bathroom all the time. But I have children. One of my children in particular has issues. Issues with anxiety, issues with language and communication, issues with knowing when it is not appropriate to talk about one’s issues with anxiety regarding digestion…

So I thought I was clever when I introduced the idea of referring to poops as victories, because that just sounds better. I now understand that we will probably never get through a day without talking about pooping. A more achievable (but probably still unlikely) goal would be to talk about pooping in less graphic detail. Or at least to reduce (but not eliminate, sorry for the pun) our frank and graphic discussions of pooping while some people are trying to choke down their dinner without gagging.

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I printed up this nice little encouragement and sealed it with clear Contact paper. I could have used the glass that came with the frame instead, but glass in picture frames is a no-no at our house.

Since I’m an optimist, I used a dry erase marker to fill in the zeroes. A realist would probably have used a Sharpie, but I try to keep it positive around here.

The cardboard at the back of the frame was mangled, so I fixed it with cardboard, a soda can tab, and a blob of hot glue.

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I am expecting wonderful things!

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At our house, “victory” is the code word for “poop.”

 

A hole in my favorite jeans!

Doggone it, just when I was getting them broken in!  These are my favorites too.

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Normally by the time I’ve ripped the knees out of my jeans, I’ve ripped a lot of other stuff out too and I don’t even bother to mend them.  But I really like these jeans, so I decided a patch was in order.

I don’t know about you, but when I have a giant hole in my clothes, I like to put a giant obnoxious patch on it.  I’m glad that I can sew, and I don’t mind a patch as long as the patch is as awesome as the jeans.

I used some polyester knit scraps and an old button to make a patch and I won’t bore you with the details. The knit has a little bit of stretch, so I hope the patch will stretch at the knees instead of tearing again.

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I flipped my pants inside out and then ripped the seam of the pants near the hole – a few inches above it and a few inches below it.  I ripped out the non-topstitched seam because that’s a lot easier to sew back together when I’m done.

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I pinned my patch to the right side of my pants directly over the hole.  Then I zigzagged all the way around the patch.

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This is what it looks like from the other side.

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Then I pinned the seam that I tore out earlier, and I sewed it back up.  I used the stretch stitch on my machine.

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And here are my jeans, as good as new!  Well, now that I see the photo, I am a bit concerned about the area under the patch.  It’s looking pretty worn.  But I have some lovely grass-like green poly knit that I can use for patch number two if necessary.  I could make that little ducky a nest.

I know what else is coming.  When I made the patch, I cut out a second duck (mirror image) for when the other knee goes. I’ll give it about a week.

Thanks for stopping by!

 

Crafty Quickie: Memory Wire Bracelets

SAMSUNG

My daughter and I had a few minutes at the end of the day and she was feeling crafty, so we knocked out a couple of memory wire bracelets.  I chose some glass beads that were purplish and greenish and goldish.  She chose some plastic beads that were sparkly green and gray/blue pearls.  She is a faster beader than her mother.  When we ran out of time, she was already done and I was not, so I clipped the wire and ended it early.

When I conned her into posing for a photo, she wanted to cover her hands because her nails were not at their best.  I just laughed.  Her skin is so beautiful and she doesn’t even know it!  She looked at the photo when we were done and wondered why I had so many splotches and wrinkles on my hand.  I told her it was because I was 46.  The awesome thing is that I know in another 40 years, I may look at this photo and think how young my hands looked.  We never miss it until it’s gone!

My daughter’s first knitting project

Color me proud!  My twelve-year-old daughter was exploring my yarn for something to do.  She said crochet was “too hard.”  I couldn’t teach her how to knit since I don’t know how myself.  I had a knitting loom upstairs that I bought in a fit of madness, thinking I could figure it out.  Somehow, I never found the time.  But she did!

She's getting bored and she's almost out of yarn, so she's almost done!
She’s getting bored and she’s almost out of yarn, so she’s almost done!

The yarn is Lion Brand Homespun.  It’s acrylic, so it’s easy to care for, and this scarf is very, very soft.

My daughter tells me she made a bunch of mistakes, but I can’t tell.  I guess that’s an extra reason to love textured yarn.

A little closer...
A little closer…

My daughter is trying to decide if she should sew the ends together or leave it like a rectangle.  If she leaves it like a rectangle, should she leave the ends plain, or should she make a little fringe?  So many options, and no pattern or teacher, just the instructions that came with the loom!  I am really proud of her.  I wonder if she can teach me how to do this?